Max Vaccine Immunity Calculator

By Łucja Zaborowska, MD and Arturo Barrantes
Last updated: Apr 13, 2021

Yay! You've finally gotten your first dose of COVID-19 vaccine! 💉

The world's speeding up the vaccination process – you're one of 565 million people who have just taken their first step towards maximum safety! Was it Pfizer? Moderna? AstraZeneca? Johnson & Johnson’s? Are you wondering how long it will take for the full immunity to kick in? Don't you worry – we have it all figured out!

We'll calculate all the most important dates on your vaccination road and let you know when exactly you'll be gain maximum protection. We all deserve times when Covid-19 will no longer be a threat – the vaccines are a key to that! 🤗

Types of vaccines

There are three main types of COVID-19 vaccines produced worldwide; we will quickly talk about each of them.

  1. mRNA as in Pfizer-Biotech, Moderna 🍲

    You may imagine the messenger RNA as a recipe for a meal that's made out of the coronavirus parts – only the cells which receive the recipe will be able to produce the dish. Our immunological system may taste the prepared meal and quickly learn that it doesn't like it – the virus parts are harmful and should be quickly destroyed.

    This way, when our organism comes in contact with a real, whole virus, it immediately knows what to do – that's what the "tasting" was for.

  2. Vector as in AstraZeneca, Sputnik, Sinopharm 🐎

    To make things easier, let's think about the Trojan horse; we use the vector (a safe, hollow virus) to carry pieces of coronavirus into the cell.

    The cells can then produce proteins characteristic of COVID-19 so that the immunological system can learn how to recognize them.

  3. Protein subunits as in Novavax ⚙️

    The vaccine contains harmless parts of coronavirus that train the immunological system to quickly recognize the virus itself and fight it effectively. This vaccine is not yet authorized to use anywhere in the world.

💡 All the vaccine mechanisms that we enumerated above serve one common purpose: to protect us from the severe form of the disease, its complications, and consequently lower overall mortality. However, it doesn't mean that we won't be able to catch the virus at all.

COVID-19 vaccines are especially important for people who have higher chances for a critical course of the disease, such as:

  • Older generations;
  • Patients with higher BMI; and
  • Patients with compromised immunity:
    • Infected with HIV;
    • Taking steroids for a longer period of time; and
    • People undertaking chemotherapy or sick with cancer.

Post-vaccination immunity calendars

Let's look at the COVID-19 immunity calendars and compare the different vaccines' mode of operation!

There's only more thing you need to know – every immunological system is different, and so is the response to the vaccine. That's why the scientific data cannot be always accurate for the full 100% of the population. 📚

pfizer vaccine immunity calendar

johnson & johnson Janssen vaccine immunity calendar

moderna vaccine immunity calendar

sputnik vaccine immunity calendar

Sinopharm vaccine immunity calendar

Sinopharm vaccine immunity calendar

How to use the post-vaccine immunity calculator?

Our tool is extremely easy to use – in most cases, all you need is your first vaccination date! Take a look at the hints below to squeeze out the most of our calculator. 🤓

  1. Is your second dose on schedule?

    When receiving the first dose, you're supposed to get your second dose date straight away, usually written on a special vaccination ticket you receive.

    • If you follow that time of vaccination, you're on schedule.
    • If you changed the date of your second dose, you need to input your second vaccination date as well for the calculator to work correctly.
  2. Johnson & Johnson’s and AstraZeneca exceptions

    • Johnson & Johnson’s vaccine requires only 1 dose – the calculations just couldn't be easier!

    • AstraZeneca is quite an unusual vaccine – the period between the 1st and 2nd dose may range between 4 and 12 weeks. Because this time is not fixed, we had to ask you to input both of your vaccination dates.

Effectivity of vaccines

We usually describe a few different kinds of vaccine effectivity; we may talk about:

  • Effectivity against symptomatic disease – we decide that the vaccine's effective even if someone caught the virus after vaccination, but didn't have any symptoms at all.
  • Effectivity against the documented infection – we decide that vaccine's effective only if someone didn't catch the virus at all after vaccination, either with or without symptoms.

Let's compare the effectivity of different vaccines – the higher the percentage, the higher the effectivity:

  • Pfizer – mean effectiveness against the documented infection: 92%
    • Both types of effectiveness reach up to 100%, and are statistically higher in women.
    • This result was tested in real life – it means that the vaccine was tested in a broader range of populations and situations, for a longer period of time.
  • Moderna – mean effectivity against the documented infection: 94.1%
    • Effectivity is statistically higher in men.
    • This result was tested during a clinical trial – this means that the vaccine was tested in a specific, controlled clinical situations, with a limited number of people.
  • AstraZeneca – mean effectivity against the documented infection: 70.4%
  • Johnson & Johnson’s – mean effectivity against the symptomatic disease: 66%
❗ We still need to remember, vaccination doesn't mean that you're not able to carry the virus – you are protected, you won't get sick, but you may still transfer the disease to others – that's why you still need to wash your hands, wear a mask and maintain social distancing.

Vaccines side effects

Most side effects include the reddening, painfulness or numbness of the arm – fever and swollen lymph nodes are also common, especially after the 2nd dose.

It's okay to experience all these signs and symptoms – they're the evidence that your immunological system is working properly. You may take some paracetamol (acetaminophen) to ease the pain and the fever.

Consult your doctor if:

  • You start to feel extremely unwell;
  • You notice small, multiple red spots/bruises on your skin; or
  • You notice a lip/eyelid drop, paresis, or any sign you find disturbing.
💡 The vaccines' serious side effects are extremely rare, but they do happen – at the same time keep in mind that falling sick with COVID-19 brings an enormous number of complications, including the thromboembolism.

To keep things simple – it's a thousand times more probable that you'd experience COVID-19 complications than the vaccine side effects. 💉

Is AstraZeneca safe?

We've all heard multiple news stories about the AstraZeneca vaccine – some of them may seem disturbing. Although the European Medicines Agency has released a statement that confirmed the benefits of the vaccination, you still may have some doubts – let's quickly debunk some of them. ⤵️

The risk of blood clots

  1. Vaccine doesn't increase blood clots' risk in the entire population. Taking the vaccine doesn't automatically elevate your risk of thromboembolic episodes, no matter if you're already prone to them or not.

  2. Vaccine is probably associated with the extremely rare disorder that may cause both low level of platelets and blood clots in different organism's vessels. This means that some people, in scarce situations (25 in 20 million), may develop this condition. We still can't tell why these particular individuals fall sick – we know, however, that this disease may also develop after:

    • Regular infection; 🤧
    • Pregnancy; 🤰
    • Trauma; 🤕 or
    • Without any typical cause at all.

Why do we choose to be vaccinated?

  1. Covid-19 is a disease connected to the high risk of excessive clotting and thromboembolic episodes. We already know that all Covid-19 patients have an increased risk for different kinds of complications resulting from blood clots. Studies have found that this fact is closely related to the increased coronavirus mortality rates.

    💊 The risk of blood clots resulting from coronavirus infection is probably a thousand times higher than the risk from a vaccine.
  2. We are aware that Covid-19 doesn't kill only with blood clots, and even despite our younger age, we shouldn't feel entirely safe. Children that already had coronavirus are prone to PIMS – a rare autoimmune disorder (similar to the Kawasaki disease) that may cause severe, or even fatal complications, such as the heart attack.

  3. Argument that we don't really like, but may prove the point. Some of us are used to taking drugs whose probable blood clotting potential is much higher than the one from the vaccine – and we usually don't even know about it. We could name, e.g., contraceptive pills.

FAQ

When will I gain full immunity with Pfizer/Biotech vaccine?

According to the United States Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), post-vaccine immunization starts 2 weeks after the second shot. Consequently, if you got your second jab following the schedule (21 days between shots), you should be fully immune on the 35th day after your first dose.

When will I gain full immunity with Moderna vaccine?

According to the United States Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), immunization provided by this vaccine starts 2 weeks after the second shot. Consequently, if you got your second jab following the schedule (28 days between shots), you should be fully immune on the 42nd day after your first dose.

When will I gain full immunity with AstraZeneca vaccine?

According to the latest studies released about this vaccine, its immunization starts 2 weeks after the second shot. Consequently, if you got your second jab following the current schedule (4 to 12 weeks between shots), you should be fully immune between the 42nd day and the 98th day after your first dose.

When will I gain full immunity with Johnson & Johnson’s vaccine?

According to the United States Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), immunization provided by this vaccine starts 2 weeks after the first shot. Consequently, you should be fully immune on the 14th day after your first dose.

When will I gain full immunity with Sputnik V vaccine?

According to the Gamaleya Center (creators of the Sputnik V vaccine), immunization provided by this vaccine starts 2 weeks after the second shot. Consequently, if you got your second jab following the schedule (21 days between shots), you should be fully immune on the 35th day after your first dose.

When will I gain full immunity with Sinopharm vaccine?

According to studies conducted by Cayetano Heredia Peruvian University (UPCH), immunization provided by this vaccine starts 2 weeks after the second shot. Consequently, if you got your second jab following the schedule (21 days between shots), you should be fully immune on the 35th day after your first dose.

How long does the vaccine immunity last?

This answer's going to be extremely honest: we don't really know. So far, we're confident that the COVID vaccines' immunity will last at least over 1 year. This period, however, will be extended – the scientists are still closely monitoring patients who took the vaccine during the first clinical trials.

Łucja Zaborowska, MD and Arturo Barrantes
My vaccine jab:
Pfizer-BioNTech
First dose date
Second dose on schedule?
Yes
Maximum immunity
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