Avogadro's constant
x10²³
Mass
g
Moles
x10⁰
mol
Molecular Weight
g mol⁻¹
Number of atoms
x10²²
atoms

Avogadro's Number Calculator

By Jack Bowater.

This Avogadro's number calculator (also an Avogadro's constant calculator) will provide you with all your Avogadro's number needs. Want to know how many molecules are in a mole? We've got it. Need to know what is Avogadro's number? Find it here. Want to know what is the Avogadro's number definition, the Avogadro's number units, or what Avogadro's number is the number of? Read on to find out!

What is Avogadro's number?

The Avogadro's number definition is simple really; it is the number of particles in a mole. How many particles? Exactly 6.02214085774 ×1023 mol−1. So, thanks to this calculator, you shall never wonder "Avogadro's number is the number of what?" again! The particles can be anything, molecules, atoms and radioactive ions but also things like tanks of petrol, tubes of toothpaste, cigarettes, donuts, and even pizza! As long as there is 6.02214085774 ×1023 of them.

Avogadro's number units

The Avogadro's constant units may be difficult to deduce at first glance. How can such a strange concept have a unit? Let's have a look at the equation this Avogadro's number calculator uses:

number of atoms = Avogadro's number * moles

Now, by knowing the units of the other two variables, we can work out the Avogadro's number units:

  1. For moles, the unit is simply moles.
  2. The number of atoms is just a number; therefore it is dimensionless, i.e., it does not any units.
  3. Rearrange the formula to find Avogadro's constant: number of atoms / moles = Avogadro's number
  4. So on the left-hand side, we have no units / moles, which can be expressed as mol-1.
  5. As the left-hand side equals the right-hand side, the Avogadro's number units is mol-1.

There you go, the units of Avogadro's number is mol-1. Remember that you can always find the units of something if you know an equation with it in and the units of the rest of the variables!

Who was Avogadro?

Amedeo Avogadro was an Italian count and scientist. Born in the Italian state of Sardinia Piedmont in 1776, he received an education in law but decided to begin studying physics and maths. When he was 35, he hypothesised that gases with equal volume, temperature and pressure, would have the same number of molecules. This important revelation would go on to form part of the ideal gas law, a crucial formula in thermodynamics. He worked tirelessly as a teacher at the University of Turin, and eventually held posts within the government, which allowed him to introduce the metric system to Piedmont. He died in 1856, aged 79. Avogadro's constant was named after this man for his contributions to molecular theory, thanks to his hypotheses.

We hope you found this Avogadro's number calculator useful!

Jack Bowater.

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Avogadro's Number Calculator